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Polling

Polling

Deliveroo - Recycling Poll

December 18th 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 2,001 respondents between 23rd and 27th November 2018 on their understanding of recycling.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • A strong majority of respondents think they are well-informed about recycling (73% vs. 10% who feel uninformed).
  • However, a majority of respondents (58%) did not know that greasy pizza boxes cannot be recycled. These figures are even worse for 18-24 year olds, 66% of whom don’t realise that boxes stained with oil or remnants of pizza can’t be put into the recycling bin
  • Nearly half of those polled (49%) take the time to consider whether an item they are buying and its packaging can be recycled, whilst 71% say they recycle ‘all the time’ (24% sometimes recycle, 3% rarely recycle and 2% never recycle).

Politico - Brexit Deal

November 15th 2018

Hanbury carried out a nationally representative snap poll of 505 respondents between 8-10pm on 14 November 2018 for Politico on the Government’s proposed Brexit deal.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • The Government appears to have a major job to do to persuade the country of the merits of its Brexit deal: When asked whether Parliament should approve it, more people said No (45%) than Yes (28%).
  • Only 29% of people think that MPs should back the deal so we can ‘get on with Brexit’. Whereas 60% believe that MPs should ‘vote down the deal’. The good news for the Government is that the opposition is divided on what to do next, with some favouring a no deal Brexit (27%) and others saying there should be a second referendum (33%).
  • Similarly there does not appear to be a huge appetite for a leadership challenge to the Prime Minister. 45% say there should not be a challenge, compared to 40% who think that there should be. The Prime Minister polls better than any of her obvious rivals in the Conservative Party.

KPMG - Consumer attitudes towards Brexit

November 14th 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 4,015 respondents between the 31st October and 5th November, on consumer attitudes towards Brexit and No Deal Brexit for KPMG.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • A majority of the British public believe a No Deal Brexit is likely: 53% believe that a No Deal Brexit is likely or very likely as opposed to 21% who believe it is unlikely or very unlikely.
  • Uncertainty over Brexit is having an impact on consumer behaviour: 31% have already reduced spending on everyday items compared to 69% who haven’t. 41% of respondents believe it is likely or very likely that they will reduce spending on everyday items in the future in the face of No Deal Brexit as opposed to 30%.
  • The public are less confident about the impact of Brexit on the economy in the short term and more confident in the long term. When asked about Brexit’s impact on the economy in the first few weeks after exit 22% believe it will be positive and 46% negative. In the year after the UK leaves 33% think Brexit will be positive for the economy and 41% negative. And in 5-10 years after the UK leaves the EU 47% think it will be positive for the economy and 28% negative.

Politico - Brexit (II)

November 8th 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 3,006 respondents between the 29th October and 2nd November, on public attitudes towards Brexit for Politico.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • In general, the UK population are optimistic about the long-term economic benefits of Brexit. 48% of respondents said that Brexit will have a positive impact on the economy in the next decade.
  • Among a menu of potential consequences, prices in the shops going up was the most powerful – 35% of Leave voters said that prices going up in shops would be likely or very likely to change their mind on Brexit, compared with 22% of Leave voters who responded that the reintroduction of a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic would.
  • 59% of respondents said that ‘thousands of bankers leaving the country’, as a result of Brexit, would be good for or make no difference to the country.

Politico - Brexit

November 5th 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 3,006 respondents between the 29th October and 2nd November, on public attitudes towards Brexit for Politico.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • Overall, the public want the Prime Minister to compromise and make a deal with the European Union, rather than walk away from negotiations: 47% of respondents say that Theresa May should ‘try to get any deal – even if she has to compromise – in order to avoid economic disruption’, compared to 35% who want her ‘walk away from negotiations, even if it means economic disruption’.
  • The public are still split over the nature of the UK’s future relationship with the EU: when presented with the outlines of the three main Brexit propositions without their traditional shorthand titles, 41% of respondents choose a ‘Canada’ style free trade agreement compared to 31% who choose the Norway’ option and 29% who select Theresa May’s ‘Chequers’ compromise.
  • There is support for extending the transition period, unless it comes with a significant price-tag: 59% say they would support extending the transition if it means the UK gets a better deal, but only 38% support this approach if the UK still has to pay money to the EU.

KPMG - Brexit

September 5th 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 3,004 respondents between August 4th and 6th 2018 on public attitudes towards Brexit for KPMG.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • A majority of the public believe the UK will leave the EU without a deal: 53% of respondents believe the UK is likely to leave without a deal compared to 20% who believe a ‘No Deal’ Brexit is unlikely.
  • The public think Brexit will have a negative impact on the UK economy in the short term, but a positive impact in the long term: 49% of respondents believe the economy will be negatively affected in the weeks after Brexit while 41% believe it will be positively affected five to ten years after the UK leaves the EU.
  • The public want to hear more from small businesses and manufacturers about Brexit: 55% of respondents say they want to hear more from small businesses and 53% want to hear more from manufacturers.

KPMG - Artificial Intelligence

August 23rd 2018

Hanbury polled a nationally representative sample of 2,000 respondents between June 9th and 13th 2018 on public attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence for KPMG.

Full tables can be found here.

Key findings

  • The UK public are worried about AI: 51% of respondents are concerned about its impact on their data privacy and 55% think it will lead to job losses.
  • Increased government regulation of AI is very popular: 59% of respondents believe there should be increased government regulation of new technologies like AI compared to just 6% who want less.
  • The UK public feel most comfortable giving their personal data to the NHS: 56% of respondents are willing to share their personal data with the NHS if it improved the service they received compared to just 8% for internet companies.
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